Civil Rights in the Texas Borderlands

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Publisher : University of Illinois Press
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ISBN 10 : 9780252096884
Pages : 280 pages
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Rating : 4.2/5 (52 users download)


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Summary Book Review Civil Rights in the Texas Borderlands :

Download or read book Civil Rights in the Texas Borderlands written by Will Guzman and published by University of Illinois Press. This book was released on 2015-01-30 with total page 280 pages. Available in PDF, EPUB and Kindle. Book excerpt: In 1907, physician Lawrence A. Nixon fled the racial violence of central Texas to settle in the border town of El Paso. There he became a community and civil rights leader. His victories in two Supreme Court decisions paved the way for dismantling all-white political primaries across the South. Will Guzmán delves into Nixon's lifelong struggle against Jim Crow. Linking Nixon's activism to his independence from the white economy, support from the NAACP, and the man's own indefatigable courage, Guzmán also sheds light on Nixon's presence in symbolic and literal borderlands--as an educated professional in a time when few went to college, as an African American who made waves when most feared violent reprisal, and as someone living on the mythical American frontier as well as an international boundary. A powerful addition to the literature on African Americans in the Southwest, Civil Rights in the Texas Borderlands explores seldom-studied corners of the Black past and the civil rights movement.

The Lynching of Mexicans in the Texas Borderlands

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Publisher : University of New Mexico Press
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ISBN 10 : 9780826358394
Pages : 240 pages
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Rating : 4.8/5 (263 users download)


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Summary Book Review The Lynching of Mexicans in the Texas Borderlands :

Download or read book The Lynching of Mexicans in the Texas Borderlands written by Nicholas Villanueva Jr. and published by University of New Mexico Press. This book was released on 2017-06-15 with total page 240 pages. Available in PDF, EPUB and Kindle. Book excerpt: More than just a civil war, the Mexican Revolution in 1910 triggered hostilities along the border between Mexico and the United States. In particular, the decade following the revolution saw a dramatic rise in the lynching of ethnic Mexicans in Texas. This book argues that ethnic and racial tension brought on by the fighting in the borderland made Anglo-Texans feel justified in their violent actions against Mexicans. They were able to use the legal system to their advantage, and their actions often went unpunished. Villanueva’s work further differentiates the borderland lynching of ethnic Mexicans from the Southern lynching of African Americans by asserting that the former was about citizenship and sovereignty, as many victims’ families had resources to investigate the crimes and thereby place the incidents on an international stage.

The Mexican American Experience in Texas

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Publisher : University of Texas Press
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Language : EN, FR, GB
ISBN 10 : 9781477324394
Pages : 432 pages
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Rating : 4.4/5 (773 users download)


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Summary Book Review The Mexican American Experience in Texas :

Download or read book The Mexican American Experience in Texas written by Martha Menchaca and published by University of Texas Press. This book was released on 2022-01-11 with total page 432 pages. Available in PDF, EPUB and Kindle. Book excerpt: For hundreds of years, Mexican Americans in Texas have fought against political oppression and exclusion—in courtrooms, in schools, at the ballot box, and beyond. Through a detailed exploration of this long battle for equality, this book illuminates critical moments of both struggle and triumph in the Mexican American experience. Martha Menchaca begins with the Spanish settlement of Texas, exploring how Mexican Americans’ racial heritage limited their incorporation into society after the territory’s annexation. She then illustrates their political struggles in the nineteenth century as they tried to assert their legal rights of citizenship and retain possession of their land, and goes on to explore their fight, in the twentieth century, against educational segregation, jury exclusion, and housing covenants. It was only in 1967, she shows, that the collective pressure placed on the state government by Mexican American and African American activists led to the beginning of desegregation. Menchaca concludes with a look at the crucial roles that Mexican Americans have played in national politics, education, philanthropy, and culture, while acknowledging the important work remaining to be done in the struggle for equality.

Civil Rights in Black and Brown

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Publisher : University of Texas Press
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ISBN 10 : 9781477323816
Pages : 576 pages
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Rating : 4.4/5 (773 users download)


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Summary Book Review Civil Rights in Black and Brown :

Download or read book Civil Rights in Black and Brown written by Max Krochmal and published by University of Texas Press. This book was released on 2021-11-09 with total page 576 pages. Available in PDF, EPUB and Kindle. Book excerpt: Not one but two civil rights movements flourished in mid-twentieth-century Texas, and they did so in intimate conversation with one another. Far from the gaze of the national media, African American and Mexican American activists combated the twin caste systems of Jim Crow and Juan Crow. These insurgents worked chiefly within their own racial groups, yet they also looked to each other for guidance and, at times, came together in solidarity. The movements sought more than integration and access: they demanded power and justice. Civil Rights in Black and Brown draws on more than 500 oral history interviews newly collected across Texas, from the Panhandle to the Piney Woods and everywhere in between. The testimonies speak in detail to the structure of racism in small towns and huge metropolises—both the everyday grind of segregation and the haunting acts of racial violence that upheld Texas’s state-sanctioned systems of white supremacy. Through their memories of resistance and revolution, the activists reveal previously undocumented struggles for equity, as well as the links Black and Chicanx organizers forged in their efforts to achieve self-determination.

The History of Texas

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Publisher : John Wiley & Sons
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Language : EN, FR, GB
ISBN 10 : 9781119581437
Pages : 560 pages
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Rating : 4.1/5 (195 users download)


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Summary Book Review The History of Texas :

Download or read book The History of Texas written by Robert A. Calvert and published by John Wiley & Sons. This book was released on 2020-03-04 with total page 560 pages. Available in PDF, EPUB and Kindle. Book excerpt: The most comprehensive, best-illustrated survey of the Lone Star State—the new, updated edition of the classic text The History of Texas offers a sweeping exploration of the Lone Star State, covering its history from the pre-Columbian period, to the era of Spanish control, to nineteenth century watershed events, through the 1900s and into the new millennium. This engaging, student-friendly textbook looks at how people of diverse politics, identity, class, ethnicity, and race shaped the state’s past and continue to influence its present. Recent knowledge on the political, social, and cultural history of Texas provides insights on the celebrated figures, unsung heroes, and ordinary people of the state’s past. The sixth edition of this classic text has been revised and updated to reflect the latest scholarship in all fields of Texas history, among them New Indian History and cultural and gender studies. The text offers fresh perspectives on Texas history, including discussions of the Progressive Era, the Great Depression, the Second World War and post-war modernization, and the state’s transition during the 1960s and into the 1980s. Revised chapters provide wide-ranging coverage of Texas in the late 20th and early 21st centuries, including recent statewide and national elections and political debates. This textbook: Connects events in post-World War II Texas to the larger U.S. historical narrative Offers substantial coverage of events occurring from 1900 to 2018 Uses a chronological approach to divide chapters into easily identifiable eras Includes engaging illustrations, maps, and tables, an appendix, and inclusive lists of recommended readings Features online resources for students and instructors, including a test bank, maps, presentation slides, and more Effectively organized to better meet the needs of instructors, The History of Texas is the ideal resource for undergraduate and graduate courses in Texas history at colleges and universities across both the state and the nation.

Blood Oranges

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Publisher : Texas A&M University Press
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ISBN 10 : 9781623494148
Pages : 412 pages
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Rating : 4.6/5 (234 users download)


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Summary Book Review Blood Oranges :

Download or read book Blood Oranges written by Timothy P. Bowman and published by Texas A&M University Press. This book was released on 2016-05-20 with total page 412 pages. Available in PDF, EPUB and Kindle. Book excerpt: Blood Oranges traces the origins and legacy of racial differences between Anglo Americans and ethnic Mexicans (Mexican nationals and Mexican Americans) in the South Texas borderlands in the twentieth century. Author Tim Bowman uncovers a complex web of historical circumstances that caused ethnic Mexicans in the region to rank among the poorest, least educated, and unhealthiest demographic in the country. The key to this development, Bowman finds, was a “modern colonization movement,” a process that had its roots in the Mexican-American war of the nineteenth century but reached its culmination in the twentieth century. South Texas, in Bowman’s words, became an “internal economy just inside of the US-Mexico border.” Beginning in the twentieth century, Anglo Americans consciously transformed the region from that of a culturally “Mexican” space, with an economy based on cattle, into one dominated by commercial agriculture focused on citrus and winter vegetables. As Anglos gained political and economic control in the region, they also consolidated their power along racial lines with laws and customs not unlike the “Jim Crow” system of southern segregation. Bowman argues that the Mexican labor class was thus transformed into a marginalized racial caste, the legacy of which remained in place even as large-scale agribusiness cemented its hold on the regional economy later in the century. Blood Oranges stands to be a major contribution to the history of South Texas and borderland studies alike.

Biscuits, the Dole, and Nodding Donkeys

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Publisher : University of Texas Press
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ISBN 10 : 9781477319475
Pages : 477 pages
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Rating : 4.4/5 (773 users download)


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Summary Book Review Biscuits, the Dole, and Nodding Donkeys :

Download or read book Biscuits, the Dole, and Nodding Donkeys written by Norman D. Brown and published by University of Texas Press. This book was released on 2019-10-22 with total page 477 pages. Available in PDF, EPUB and Kindle. Book excerpt: When the venerable historian Norman D. Brown published Hood, Bonnet, and Little Brown Jug in 1984, he earned national acclaim for revealing the audacious tactics at play in Texas politics during the Roaring Twenties, detailing the effects of the Ku Klux Klan, newly enfranchised women, and Prohibition. Shortly before his death in 2015, Brown completed Biscuits, the Dole, and Nodding Donkeys, which picks up just as the Democratic Party was poised for a bruising fight in the 1930 primary. Charting the governorships of Dan Moody, Ross Sterling, Miriam “Ma” Ferguson in her second term, and James V. Allred, this engrossing sequel takes its title from the notion that Texas politicians should give voters what they want (“When you cease to deliver the biscuits they will not be for you any longer,” said Jim “Pa” Ferguson) while remaining wary of federal assistance (the dole) in a state where the economy is fueled by oil pump jacks (nodding donkeys).Taking readers to an era when a self-serving group of Texas politicians operated in a system that was closed to anyone outside the state’s white, wealthy echelons, Brown unearths a riveting, little-known history whose impact continues to ripple at the capitol.

A Single Star and Bloody Knuckles

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Publisher : University of Texas Press
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ISBN 10 : 9781477321904
Pages : 456 pages
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Rating : 4.4/5 (773 users download)


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Summary Book Review A Single Star and Bloody Knuckles :

Download or read book A Single Star and Bloody Knuckles written by Bill Minutaglio and published by University of Texas Press. This book was released on 2021-05-04 with total page 456 pages. Available in PDF, EPUB and Kindle. Book excerpt: For John Nance “Cactus Jack” Garner, there was one simple rule in politics: “You’ve got to bloody your knuckles.” It’s a maxim that applies in so many ways to the state of Texas, where the struggle for power has often unfolded through underhanded politicking, backroom dealings, and, quite literally, bloodshed. The contentious history of Texas politics has been shaped by dangerous and often violent events, and been formed not just in the halls of power but by marginalized voices omitted from the official narratives. A Single Star and Bloody Knuckles traces the state’s conflicted and dramatic evolution over the past 150 years through its pivotal political players, including oft-neglected women and people of color. Beginning in 1870 with the birth of Texas’s modern political framework, Bill Minutaglio chronicles Texas political life against the backdrop of industry, the economy, and race relations, recasting the narrative of influential Texans. With journalistic verve and candor, Minutaglio delivers a contemporary history of the determined men and women who fought for their particular visions of Texas and helped define the state as a potent force in national affairs.

The Borderlands of Race

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Publisher : University of Texas Press
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ISBN 10 : 9780292767553
Pages : 195 pages
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Rating : 4.2/5 (927 users download)


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Summary Book Review The Borderlands of Race :

Download or read book The Borderlands of Race written by Jennifer R. Nájera and published by University of Texas Press. This book was released on 2015-05-15 with total page 195 pages. Available in PDF, EPUB and Kindle. Book excerpt: Throughout much of the twentieth century, Mexican Americans experienced segregation in many areas of public life, but the structure of Mexican segregation differed from the strict racial divides of the Jim Crow South. Factors such as higher socioeconomic status, lighter skin color, and Anglo cultural fluency allowed some Mexican Americans to gain limited access to the Anglo power structure. Paradoxically, however, this partial assimilation made full desegregation more difficult for the rest of the Mexican American community, which continued to experience informal segregation long after federal and state laws officially ended the practice. In this historical ethnography, Jennifer R. Nájera offers a layered rendering and analysis of Mexican segregation in a South Texas community in the first half of the twentieth century. Using oral histories and local archives, she brings to life Mexican origin peoples' experiences with segregation. Through their stories and supporting documentary evidence, Nájera shows how the ambiguous racial status of Mexican origin people allowed some of them to be exceptions to the rule of Anglo racial dominance. She demonstrates that while such exceptionality might suggest the permeability of the color line, in fact the selective and limited incorporation of Mexicans into Anglo society actually reinforced segregation by creating an illusion that the community had been integrated and no further changes were needed. Nájera also reveals how the actions of everyday people ultimately challenged racial/racist ideologies and created meaningful spaces for Mexicans in spheres historically dominated by Anglos.

Race, Labor, and Violence in the Delta

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Publisher : University of Arkansas Press
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ISBN 10 : 9781610757751
Pages : 178 pages
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Rating : 4.6/5 (17 users download)


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Summary Book Review Race, Labor, and Violence in the Delta :

Download or read book Race, Labor, and Violence in the Delta written by Michael Pierce and published by University of Arkansas Press. This book was released on 2022-05-30 with total page 178 pages. Available in PDF, EPUB and Kindle. Book excerpt: Race, Labor, and Violence in the Delta examines the history of labor relations and racial conflict in the Mississippi Valley from the Civil War into the late twentieth century. This essay collection grew out of a conference marking the hundredth anniversary of one of the nation’s deadliest labor conflicts—the 1919 Elaine Massacre, during which white mobs ruthlessly slaughtered over two hundred African Americans across Phillips County, Arkansas, in response to a meeting of unionized Black sharecroppers. The essays here demonstrate that the brutality that unfolded in Phillips County was characteristic of the culture of race- and labor-based violence that prevailed in the century after the Civil War. They detail how Delta landowners began seeking cheap labor as soon as the slave system ended—securing a workforce by inflicting racial terror, eroding the Reconstruction Amendments in the courts, and obstructing federal financial-relief efforts. The result was a system of peonage that continued to exploit Blacks and poor whites for their labor, sometimes fatally. In response, laborers devised their own methods for sustaining themselves and their communities: forming unions, calling strikes, relocating, and occasionally operating outside the law. By shedding light on the broader context of the Elaine Massacre, Race, Labor, and Violence in the Delta reveals that the fight against white supremacy in the Delta was necessarily a fight for better working conditions, fair labor practices, and economic justice.

The House of Truth

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Publisher : Oxford University Press
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ISBN 10 : 9780190261993
Pages : 688 pages
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Rating : 4.1/5 (92 users download)


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Summary Book Review The House of Truth :

Download or read book The House of Truth written by Brad Snyder and published by Oxford University Press. This book was released on 2017-01-04 with total page 688 pages. Available in PDF, EPUB and Kindle. Book excerpt: In 1912, a group of ambitious young men, including future Supreme Court justice Felix Frankfurter and future journalistic giant Walter Lippmann, became disillusioned by the sluggish progress of change in the Taft Administration. The individuals started to band together informally, joined initially by their enthusiasm for Theodore Roosevelt's Bull Moose campaign. They self-mockingly called the 19th Street row house in which they congregated the "House of Truth," playing off the lively dinner discussions with frequent guest (and neighbor) Oliver Wendell Holmes, Jr. about life's verities. Lippmann and Frankfurter were house-mates, and their frequent guests included not merely Holmes but Louis Brandeis, Herbert Hoover, Herbert Croly - founder of the New Republic - and the sculptor (and sometime Klansman) Gutzon Borglum, later the creator of the Mount Rushmore monument. Weaving together the stories and trajectories of these varied, fascinating, combative, and sometimes contradictory figures, Brad Snyder shows how their thinking about government and policy shifted from a firm belief in progressivism - the belief that the government should protect its workers and regulate monopolies - into what we call liberalism - the belief that government can improve citizens' lives without abridging their civil liberties and, eventually, civil rights. Holmes replaced Roosevelt in their affections and aspirations. His famous dissents from 1919 onward showed how the Due Process clause could protect not just business but equality under the law, revealing how a generally conservative and reactionary Supreme Court might embrace, even initiate, political and social reform. Across the years, from 1912 until the start of the New Deal in 1933, the remarkable group of individuals associated with the House of Truth debated the future of America. They fought over Sacco and Vanzetti's innocence; the dangers of Communism; the role the United States should play the world after World War One; and thought dynamically about things like about minimum wage, child-welfare laws, banking insurance, and Social Security, notions they not only envisioned but worked to enact. American liberalism has no single source, but one was without question a row house in Dupont Circle and the lives that intertwined there at a crucial moment in the country's history.

Mexicanos, Third Edition

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Publisher : Indiana University Press
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ISBN 10 : 9780253041753
Pages : 472 pages
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Rating : 4.2/5 (53 users download)


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Summary Book Review Mexicanos, Third Edition :

Download or read book Mexicanos, Third Edition written by Manuel G Gonzales and published by Indiana University Press. This book was released on 2019-06-05 with total page 472 pages. Available in PDF, EPUB and Kindle. Book excerpt: Responding to shifts in the political and economic experiences of Mexicans in America, this newly revised and expanded edition of Mexicanos provides a relevant and contemporary consideration of this vibrant community. Emerging from the ruins of Aztec civilization and from centuries of Spanish contact with indigenous people, Mexican culture followed the Spanish colonial frontier northward and put its distinctive mark on what became the southwestern United States. Shaped by their Indian and Spanish ancestors, deeply influenced by Catholicism, and often struggling to respond to political and economic precarity, Mexicans play an important role in US society even as the dominant Anglo culture strives to assimilate them. With new maps, updated appendicxes, and a new chapter providing an up-to-date consideration of the immigration debate centered on Mexican communities in the US, this new edition of Mexicanos provides a thorough and balanced contribution to understanding Mexicans’ history and their vital importance to 21st-century America.

Beyond Texas Through Time

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Publisher : Texas A&M University Press
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ISBN 10 : 9781603442343
Pages : 295 pages
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Rating : 4.6/5 (34 users download)


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Summary Book Review Beyond Texas Through Time :

Download or read book Beyond Texas Through Time written by Walter Louis Buenger and published by Texas A&M University Press. This book was released on 2011 with total page 295 pages. Available in PDF, EPUB and Kindle. Book excerpt: In 1991 Walter L. Buenger and the late Robert A. Calvert compiled a pioneering work in Texas historiography: Texas Through Time, a seminal survey and critique of the field of Texas history from its inception through the end of the 1980s. Now, Buenger and Arnoldo De León have assembled an important new collection that assesses the current state of Texas historiography, building on the many changes in understanding and interpretation that have developed in the nearly twenty years since the publication of the original volume. This new work, Beyond Texas Through Time, departs from the earlier volume's emphasis on the dichotomy between traditionalism and revisionism as they applied to various eras. Instead, the studies in this book consider the topical and thematic understandings of Texas historiography embraced by a new generation of Texas historians as they reflect analytically on the work of the past two decades. The resulting approaches thus offer the potential of informing the study of themes and topics other than those specifically introduced in this volume, extending its usefulness well beyond a review of the literature. In addition, the volume editors' introduction proposes the application of cultural constructionism as an important third perspective on the thematic and topical analyses provided by the other contributors. Beyond Texas Through Time offers both a vantage point and a benchmark, serving as an important reference for scholars and advanced students of history and historiography, even beyond the borders of Texas.

Parallel Encounters

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Publisher : Wilfrid Laurier Univ. Press
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ISBN 10 : 9781554589982
Pages : 354 pages
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Rating : 4.5/5 (545 users download)


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Summary Book Review Parallel Encounters :

Download or read book Parallel Encounters written by Gillian Roberts and published by Wilfrid Laurier Univ. Press. This book was released on 2014-03-24 with total page 354 pages. Available in PDF, EPUB and Kindle. Book excerpt: The essays collected in iParallel Encounters The field of border studies has hitherto neglected the Canada–US border as a site of cultural interest, tending to examine only its role in transnational policy, economic cycles, and legal and political frameworks. Border studies has long been rooted in the US–Mexico divide; shifting the locus of that discussion north to the 49th parallel, the contributors ask what added complications a site-specific analysis of culture at the Canada–US border can bring to the conversation. In so doing, this collection responds to the demands of Hemispheric American Studies to broaden considerations of the significance of American culture to the Americas as a whole—bringing Canadian Studies into dialogue with the dominantly US-centric critical theory in questions of citizenship, globalization, Indigenous mobilization, hemispheric exchange, and transnationalism.

Agent of Change

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Publisher : University of Texas Press
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ISBN 10 : 9781477319895
Pages : 310 pages
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Rating : 4.4/5 (773 users download)


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Summary Book Review Agent of Change :

Download or read book Agent of Change written by Cynthia E. Orozco and published by University of Texas Press. This book was released on 2020-01-10 with total page 310 pages. Available in PDF, EPUB and Kindle. Book excerpt: The essayist Adela Sloss-Vento (1901–1998) was a powerhouse of activism in South Texas’s Lower Rio Grande Valley throughout the Mexican American civil rights movement beginning in 1920 and the subsequent Chicano movement of the 1960s and 1970s. At last presenting the full story of Sloss-Vento’s achievements, Agent of Change revives a forgotten history of a major female Latina leader. Bringing to light the economic and political transformations that swept through South Texas in the 1920s as ranching declined and agribusiness proliferated, Cynthia E. Orozco situates Sloss-Vento’s early years within the context of the Jim Crow/Juan Crow era. Recounting Sloss-Vento’s rise to prominence as a public intellectual, Orozco highlights a partnership with Alonso S. Perales, the principal founder of the League of United Latin American Citizens. Agent of Change explores such contradictions as Sloss-Vento’s tolerance of LULAC’s gender-segregated chapters, even though the activist was an outspoken critic of male privilege in the home and a decidedly progressive wife and mother. Inspiring and illuminating, this is a complete portrait of a savvy, brazen critic who demanded reform on both sides of the US-Mexico border.

Blue Texas

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Publisher : UNC Press Books
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ISBN 10 : 9781469626765
Pages : 552 pages
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Rating : 4.4/5 (696 users download)


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Summary Book Review Blue Texas :

Download or read book Blue Texas written by Max Krochmal and published by UNC Press Books. This book was released on 2016-10-07 with total page 552 pages. Available in PDF, EPUB and Kindle. Book excerpt: This book is about the other Texas, not the state known for its cowboy conservatism, but a mid-twentieth-century hotbed of community organizing, liberal politics, and civil rights activism. Beginning in the 1930s, Max Krochmal tells the story of the decades-long struggle for democracy in Texas, when African American, Mexican American, and white labor and community activists gradually came together to empower the state's marginalized minorities. At the ballot box and in the streets, these diverse activists demanded not only integration but economic justice, labor rights, and real political power for all. Their efforts gave rise to the Democratic Coalition of the 1960s, a militant, multiracial alliance that would take on and eventually overthrow both Jim Crow and Juan Crow. Using rare archival sources and original oral history interviews, Krochmal reveals the often-overlooked democratic foundations and liberal tradition of one of our nation's most conservative states. Blue Texas remembers the many forgotten activists who, by crossing racial lines and building coalitions, democratized their cities and state to a degree that would have been unimaginable just a decade earlier--and it shows why their story still matters today.

Projecting Ethnicity and Race

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Publisher : Greenwood Publishing Group
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ISBN 10 : 0313317410
Pages : 294 pages
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Rating : 4.3/5 (174 users download)


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Summary Book Review Projecting Ethnicity and Race :

Download or read book Projecting Ethnicity and Race written by Marsha J. Hamilton and published by Greenwood Publishing Group. This book was released on 2003 with total page 294 pages. Available in PDF, EPUB and Kindle. Book excerpt: Reviews nearly 500 English language studies published between 1915 and 2001 that examine the depiction of ethnic, racial, and national groups as portrayed in U.S. feature films from the inception of cinema through the present.