Inequality in the Promised Land

Download Inequality in the Promised Land PDF

Author :
Publisher : Stanford University Press
Release Date :
Language : EN, FR, GB
ISBN 10 : 0804792135
Pages : 232 pages
File : PDF, EPUB, or MOBI
Rating : 4.7/5 (921 users download)


GO BOOK!


Summary Book Review Inequality in the Promised Land :

Download or read book Inequality in the Promised Land written by R. Lewis-McCoy and published by Stanford University Press. This book was released on 2014-06-25 with total page 232 pages. Available in PDF, EPUB and Kindle. Book excerpt: Nestled in neighborhoods of varying degrees of affluence, suburban public schools are typically better resourced than their inner-city peers and known for their extracurricular offerings and college preparatory programs. Despite the glowing opportunities that many families associate with suburban schooling, accessing a district's resources is not always straightforward, particularly for black and poorer families. Moving beyond class- and race-based explanations, Inequality in the Promised Land focuses on the everyday interactions between parents, students, teachers, and school administrators in order to understand why resources seldom trickle down to a district's racial and economic minorities. Rolling Acres Public Schools (RAPS) is one of the many well-appointed suburban school districts across the United States that has become increasingly racially and economically diverse over the last forty years. Expanding on Charles Tilly's model of relational analysis and drawing on 100 in-depth interviews as well participant observation and archival research, R. L'Heureux Lewis-McCoy examines the pathways of resources in RAPS. He discovers that—due to structural factors, social and class positions, and past experiences—resources are not valued equally among families and, even when deemed valuable, financial factors and issues of opportunity hoarding often prevent certain RAPS families from accessing that resource. In addition to its fresh and incisive insights into educational inequality, this groundbreaking book also presents valuable policy-orientated solutions for administrators, teachers, activists, and politicians.

Inequality in the Promised Land

Download Inequality in the Promised Land PDF

Author :
Publisher : Stanford University Press
Release Date :
Language : EN, FR, GB
ISBN 10 : 9780804792455
Pages : 232 pages
File : PDF, EPUB, or MOBI
Rating : 4.8/5 (47 users download)


GO BOOK!


Summary Book Review Inequality in the Promised Land :

Download or read book Inequality in the Promised Land written by R. L’Heureux Lewis-McCoy and published by Stanford University Press. This book was released on 2014-06-25 with total page 232 pages. Available in PDF, EPUB and Kindle. Book excerpt: Nestled in neighborhoods of varying degrees of affluence, suburban public schools are typically better resourced than their inner-city peers and known for their extracurricular offerings and college preparatory programs. Despite the glowing opportunities that many families associate with suburban schooling, accessing a district's resources is not always straightforward, particularly for black and poorer families. Moving beyond class- and race-based explanations, Inequality in the Promised Land focuses on the everyday interactions between parents, students, teachers, and school administrators in order to understand why resources seldom trickle down to a district's racial and economic minorities. Rolling Acres Public Schools (RAPS) is one of the many well-appointed suburban school districts across the United States that has become increasingly racially and economically diverse over the last forty years. Expanding on Charles Tilly's model of relational analysis and drawing on 100 in-depth interviews as well participant observation and archival research, R. L'Heureux Lewis-McCoy examines the pathways of resources in RAPS. He discovers that—due to structural factors, social and class positions, and past experiences—resources are not valued equally among families and, even when deemed valuable, financial factors and issues of opportunity hoarding often prevent certain RAPS families from accessing that resource. In addition to its fresh and incisive insights into educational inequality, this groundbreaking book also presents valuable policy-orientated solutions for administrators, teachers, activists, and politicians.

Our Sisters' Promised Land

Download Our Sisters' Promised Land PDF

Author :
Publisher : University of Michigan Press
Release Date :
Language : EN, FR, GB
ISBN 10 : 0472089307
Pages : 308 pages
File : PDF, EPUB, or MOBI
Rating : 4.0/5 (893 users download)


GO BOOK!


Summary Book Review Our Sisters' Promised Land :

Download or read book Our Sisters' Promised Land written by Ayala Emmett and published by University of Michigan Press. This book was released on 2003-07-16 with total page 308 pages. Available in PDF, EPUB and Kindle. Book excerpt: A groundbreaking study of the role of women as political actors—and peacemakers—in the Middle East

Promises in the Promised Land

Download Promises in the Promised Land PDF

Author :
Publisher : Greenwood Publishing Group
Release Date :
Language : EN, FR, GB
ISBN 10 : 0313267847
Pages : 232 pages
File : PDF, EPUB, or MOBI
Rating : 4.2/5 (678 users download)


GO BOOK!


Summary Book Review Promises in the Promised Land :

Download or read book Promises in the Promised Land written by Vered Kraus and published by Greenwood Publishing Group. This book was released on 1990 with total page 232 pages. Available in PDF, EPUB and Kindle. Book excerpt: From its beginning as an independent state, Israel has been beset by the divisions and tensions that characterize most ethnically mixed societies. This extensively detailed analysis accounts for status attainment in Israeli society by investigating the process of stratification. It documents what happened to Arabs as well as Jewish immigrants and their children by tracing not only the socioeconomic locations, but also the proximate social determinants of the locations of significant ethnic, cultural, gender, and religious groups. Many of the research findings in this timely study have significant implications for social policy in Israel and elsewhere.

The Color of Mind

Download The Color of Mind PDF

Author :
Publisher : University of Chicago Press
Release Date :
Language : EN, FR, GB
ISBN 10 : 9780226525358
Pages : 209 pages
File : PDF, EPUB, or MOBI
Rating : 4.2/5 (265 users download)


GO BOOK!


Summary Book Review The Color of Mind :

Download or read book The Color of Mind written by Derrick Darby and published by University of Chicago Press. This book was released on 2018-01-24 with total page 209 pages. Available in PDF, EPUB and Kindle. Book excerpt: American students vary in educational achievement, but white students in general typically have better test scores and grades than black students. Why is this the case, and what can school leaders do about it? In The Color of Mind, Derrick Darby and John L. Rury answer these pressing questions and show that we cannot make further progress in closing the achievement gap until we understand its racist origins. Telling the story of what they call the Color of Mind—the idea that there are racial differences in intelligence, character, and behavior—they show how philosophers, such as David Hume and Immanuel Kant, and American statesman Thomas Jefferson, contributed to the construction of this pernicious idea, how it influenced the nature of schooling and student achievement, and how voices of dissent such as Frederick Douglass, Frances Ellen Watkins Harper, and W. E. B. Du Bois debunked the Color of Mind and worked to undo its adverse impacts. Rejecting the view that racial differences in educational achievement are a product of innate or cultural differences, Darby and Rury uncover the historical interplay between ideas about race and American schooling, to show clearly that the racial achievement gap has been socially and institutionally constructed. School leaders striving to bring justice and dignity to American schools today must work to root out the systemic manifestations of these ideas within schools, while still doing what they can to mitigate the negative effects of poverty, segregation, inequality, and other external factors that adversely affect student achievement. While we cannot expect schools alone to solve these vexing social problems, we must demand that they address the dignitary injustices associated with how we track, discipline, and deal with special education that reinforce long-standing racist ideas. That is the only way to expel the Color of Mind from schools, close the racial achievement gap, and afford all children the dignity they deserve.

Education in a New Society

Download Education in a New Society PDF

Author :
Publisher : University of Chicago Press
Release Date :
Language : EN, FR, GB
ISBN 10 : 9780226517568
Pages : 464 pages
File : PDF, EPUB, or MOBI
Rating : 4.2/5 (265 users download)


GO BOOK!


Summary Book Review Education in a New Society :

Download or read book Education in a New Society written by Jal Mehta and published by University of Chicago Press. This book was released on 2018-04-26 with total page 464 pages. Available in PDF, EPUB and Kindle. Book excerpt: In recent decades, sociology of education has been dominated by quantitative analyses of race, class, and gender gaps in educational achievement. And while there’s no question that such work is important, it leaves a lot of other fruitful areas of inquiry unstudied. This book takes that problem seriously, considering the way the field has developed since the 1960s and arguing powerfully for its renewal. The sociology of education, the contributors show, largely works with themes, concepts, and theories that were generated decades ago, even as both the actual world of education and the discipline of sociology have changed considerably. The moment has come, they argue, to break free of the past and begin asking new questions and developing new programs of empirical study. Both rallying cry and road map, Education in a New Society will galvanize the field.

Routledge Handbook of Social, Economic, and Criminal Justice

Download Routledge Handbook of Social, Economic, and Criminal Justice PDF

Author :
Publisher : Routledge
Release Date :
Language : EN, FR, GB
ISBN 10 : 9781351002684
Pages : 384 pages
File : PDF, EPUB, or MOBI
Rating : 4.3/5 (51 users download)


GO BOOK!


Summary Book Review Routledge Handbook of Social, Economic, and Criminal Justice :

Download or read book Routledge Handbook of Social, Economic, and Criminal Justice written by Cliff Roberson and published by Routledge. This book was released on 2018-05-04 with total page 384 pages. Available in PDF, EPUB and Kindle. Book excerpt: This authoritative volume explores different perspectives on economic and social justice and the challenges presented by and within the criminal justice system. It critically discusses key concerns involved in realizing economic and social justice, including systemic issues in economic and social justice, issues related to organizations and social institutions, special issues regarding specific populations, and a review of national and international organizations that promote economic justice. Addressing more than just the ideology and theory underlying economic and social justice, the book presents chapters with practical examples and research on how economic and social justice might be achieved within the criminal justice systems of the world. With contributions from leading scholars around the globe, this book is an essential reference for scholars with an interest in economic and social justice from a wide range of disciplines, including criminal justice and criminology as well as sociology, social work, public policy, and law.

Divergent Paths to College

Download Divergent Paths to College PDF

Author :
Publisher : Rutgers University Press
Release Date :
Language : EN, FR, GB
ISBN 10 : 9780813590271
Pages : 240 pages
File : PDF, EPUB, or MOBI
Rating : 4.8/5 (135 users download)


GO BOOK!


Summary Book Review Divergent Paths to College :

Download or read book Divergent Paths to College written by Megan M Holland and published by Rutgers University Press. This book was released on 2019-02-04 with total page 240 pages. Available in PDF, EPUB and Kindle. Book excerpt: In Divergent Paths to College, Megan M. Holland examines how high schools structure different pathways that lead students to very different college destinations based on race and class. She finds that racial and class inequalities are reproduced through unequal access to key sources of information, even among students in the same school and even in schools with well-established college-going cultures. As the college application process becomes increasingly complex and high-stakes, social capital, or relationships with people who can provide information as well as support and guidance, becomes much more critical. Although much has been written about the college-bound experience, we know less about the role that social capital plays, and specifically how high schools can serve as organizational brokers of social ties. The relationships that high schools cultivate between students and higher education institutions by inviting college admissions officers into their schools to market to students, is a particularly critical, yet unexplored source of college information.

Promised Land

Download Promised Land PDF

Author :
Publisher : Food First Books
Release Date :
Language : EN, FR, GB
ISBN 10 : 0935028285
Pages : 404 pages
File : PDF, EPUB, or MOBI
Rating : 4.0/5 (282 users download)


GO BOOK!


Summary Book Review Promised Land :

Download or read book Promised Land written by Peter Rosset and published by Food First Books. This book was released on 2006 with total page 404 pages. Available in PDF, EPUB and Kindle. Book excerpt: This book represents the first harvest in the English language of the work of the Land Research Action Network (LRAN). LRAN is an international working group of researchers, analysts, nongovernment organizations, and representatives of social movements. -- pref.

We Live for the We

Download We Live for the We PDF

Author :
Publisher : Hachette UK
Release Date :
Language : EN, FR, GB
ISBN 10 : 9781568588551
Pages : 272 pages
File : PDF, EPUB, or MOBI
Rating : 4.5/5 (685 users download)


GO BOOK!


Summary Book Review We Live for the We :

Download or read book We Live for the We written by Dani McClain and published by Hachette UK. This book was released on 2019-04-02 with total page 272 pages. Available in PDF, EPUB and Kindle. Book excerpt: A warm, wise, and urgent guide to parenting in uncertain times, from a longtime reporter on race, reproductive health, and politics In We Live for the We, first-time mother Dani McClain sets out to understand how to raise her daughter in what she, as a black woman, knows to be an unjust -- even hostile -- society. Black women are more likely to die during pregnancy or birth than any other race; black mothers must stand before television cameras telling the world that their slain children were human beings. What, then, is the best way to keep fear at bay and raise a child so she lives with dignity and joy? McClain spoke with mothers on the frontlines of movements for social, political, and cultural change who are grappling with the same questions. Following a child's development from infancy to the teenage years, We Live for the We touches on everything from the importance of creativity to building a mutually supportive community to navigating one's relationship with power and authority. It is an essential handbook to help us imagine the society we build for the next generation.

The Journey Before Us

Download The Journey Before Us PDF

Author :
Publisher : Rutgers University Press
Release Date :
Language : EN, FR, GB
ISBN 10 : 9781978805620
Pages : 190 pages
File : PDF, EPUB, or MOBI
Rating : 4.9/5 (788 users download)


GO BOOK!


Summary Book Review The Journey Before Us :

Download or read book The Journey Before Us written by Laura Nichols and published by Rutgers University Press. This book was released on 2020-01-17 with total page 190 pages. Available in PDF, EPUB and Kindle. Book excerpt: Why is college completion so closely linked to social class? In The Journey Before Us, Laura Nichols looks at the experiences of aspiring first-generation college students from middle-school to young adulthood and shows what must change in order to improve college pathways and graduate more students.

Childhood in the Promised Land

Download Childhood in the Promised Land PDF

Author :
Publisher : Duke University Press
Release Date :
Language : EN, FR, GB
ISBN 10 : 9780822383963
Pages : 430 pages
File : PDF, EPUB, or MOBI
Rating : 4.8/5 (223 users download)


GO BOOK!


Summary Book Review Childhood in the Promised Land :

Download or read book Childhood in the Promised Land written by Laura Lee Downs and published by Duke University Press. This book was released on 2002-11-08 with total page 430 pages. Available in PDF, EPUB and Kindle. Book excerpt: Childhood in the Promised Land is the first history of France's colonies de vacances, a vast network of summer camps created for working-class children. The colonies originated as a late-nineteenth-century charitable institution, providing rural retreats intended to restore the fragile health of poor urban children. Participation grew steadily throughout the first half of the twentieth century, "trickling up" by the late 1940s to embrace middle-class youth as well. At the heart of the study lie the municipal colonies de vacances, organized by the working-class cities of the Paris red belt. Located in remote villages or along the more inexpensive stretches of the Atlantic coast, the municipal colonies gathered their young clientele into variously structured "child villages," within which they were to live out particular, ideal visions of the collective life of children throughout the long summer holiday. Focusing on the creation of and participation in these summer camps, Laura Lee Downs presents surprising insights into the location and significance of childhood in French working-class cities and, ultimately, within the development of modern France. Drawing on a rich array of historical sources, including dossiers and records of municipal colonies discovered in remote town halls of the Paris suburbs, newspaper accounts, and interviews with adults who participated in the colonies as children, Downs reveals how diverse groups—including local Socialist and Communist leaders and Catholic seminarians—seized the opportunity to shape the minds and bodies of working-class youth. Childhood in the Promised Land shows how, in creating the summer camps, these various groups combined pedagogical theories, religious convictions, political ideologies, and theories about the relationship between the countryside and children's physical and cognitive development. At the same time, the book sheds light on classic questions of social control, highlighting the active role of the children in shaping their experiences.

Asian Migration and Education Cultures in the Anglosphere

Download Asian Migration and Education Cultures in the Anglosphere PDF

Author :
Publisher : Routledge
Release Date :
Language : EN, FR, GB
ISBN 10 : 9780429607882
Pages : 198 pages
File : PDF, EPUB, or MOBI
Rating : 4.4/5 (296 users download)


GO BOOK!


Summary Book Review Asian Migration and Education Cultures in the Anglosphere :

Download or read book Asian Migration and Education Cultures in the Anglosphere written by Megan Watkins and published by Routledge. This book was released on 2019-03-27 with total page 198 pages. Available in PDF, EPUB and Kindle. Book excerpt: Asian migration and mobilities are transforming education cultures in the Anglosphere, prompting mounting debates about ‘tiger mothers’ and ‘dragon children’, and competition and segregation in Anglosphere schools. This book challenges the cultural essentialism which prevails in much academic and popular discussion of ‘Asian success’ and in relation to Asian education mobilities. As anxiety and aspiration within these spaces are increasingly ethnicised, the children of Asian migrants are both admired and resented for their educational success. This book explores popular perceptions of Asian migrant families through in-depth empirically informed accounts on the broader economic, social, historical and geo-political contexts within which education cultures are produced. This includes contributions from academics on global markets and national policies around migration and education, classed trajectories and articulations, local formations of ‘ethnic capital’, and transnational assemblages that produce education and mobility as means for social advancement. At a time when our schooling systems and communities are undergoing rapid transformations as a result of increasing global mobility, this book is a unique and important contribution to an issue of pressing significance. This book was originally published as a special issue of the Journal of Ethnic and Migration Studies.

Negotiating Opportunities

Download Negotiating Opportunities PDF

Author :
Publisher : Oxford University Press
Release Date :
Language : EN, FR, GB
ISBN 10 : 9780190634469
Pages : 256 pages
File : PDF, EPUB, or MOBI
Rating : 4.1/5 (96 users download)


GO BOOK!


Summary Book Review Negotiating Opportunities :

Download or read book Negotiating Opportunities written by Jessica McCrory Calarco and published by Oxford University Press. This book was released on 2018-02-01 with total page 256 pages. Available in PDF, EPUB and Kindle. Book excerpt: In Negotiating Opportunities, Jessica McCrory Calarco argues that the middle class has a negotiated advantage in school. Drawing on five years of ethnographic fieldwork, Calarco traces that negotiated advantage from its origins at home to its consequences at school. Through their parents' coaching, working-class students learn to follow rules and work through problems independently. Middle-class students learn to challenge rules and request assistance, accommodations, and attention in excess of what is fair or required. Teachers typically grant those requests, creating advantages for middle-class students. Calarco concludes with recommendations, advocating against deficit-oriented programs that teach middle-class behaviors to working-class students. Those programs ignore the value of working-class students' resourcefulness, respect, and responsibility, and they do little to prevent middle-class families from finding new opportunities to negotiate advantages in school.

Scripting the Moves

Download Scripting the Moves PDF

Author :
Publisher : Princeton University Press
Release Date :
Language : EN, FR, GB
ISBN 10 : 9780691200019
Pages : 248 pages
File : PDF, EPUB, or MOBI
Rating : 4.6/5 (912 users download)


GO BOOK!


Summary Book Review Scripting the Moves :

Download or read book Scripting the Moves written by Joanne W. Golann and published by Princeton University Press. This book was released on 2021-06-08 with total page 248 pages. Available in PDF, EPUB and Kindle. Book excerpt: An inside look at a "no-excuses" charter school that reveals this educational model’s strengths and weaknesses, and how its approach shapes students Silent, single-file lines. Detention for putting a head on a desk. Rules for how to dress, how to applaud, how to complete homework. Walk into some of the most acclaimed urban schools today and you will find similar recipes of behavior, designed to support student achievement. But what do these “scripts” accomplish? Immersing readers inside a “no-excuses” charter school, Scripting the Moves offers a telling window into an expanding model of urban education reform. Through interviews with students, teachers, administrators, and parents, and analysis of documents and data, Joanne Golann reveals that such schools actually dictate too rigid a level of social control for both teachers and their predominantly low-income Black and Latino students. Despite good intentions, scripts constrain the development of important interactional skills and reproduce some of the very inequities they mean to disrupt. Golann presents a fascinating, sometimes painful, account of how no-excuses schools use scripts to regulate students and teachers. She shows why scripts were adopted, what purposes they serve, and where they fall short. What emerges is a complicated story of the benefits of scripts, but also their limitations, in cultivating the tools students need to navigate college and other complex social institutions—tools such as flexibility, initiative, and ease with adults. Contrasting scripts with tools, Golann raises essential questions about what constitutes cultural capital—and how this capital might be effectively taught. Illuminating and accessible, Scripting the Moves delves into the troubling realities behind current education reform and reenvisions what it takes to prepare students for long-term success.

Promised Land

Download Promised Land PDF

Author :
Publisher : Simon and Schuster
Release Date :
Language : EN, FR, GB
ISBN 10 : 9781982102715
Pages : 336 pages
File : PDF, EPUB, or MOBI
Rating : 4.9/5 (821 users download)


GO BOOK!


Summary Book Review Promised Land :

Download or read book Promised Land written by David Stebenne and published by Simon and Schuster. This book was released on 2021-07-20 with total page 336 pages. Available in PDF, EPUB and Kindle. Book excerpt: "Explains how the American middle class ballooned at mid-century until it dominated the nation, showing who benefited and what brought the expansion to an end"--

Critical Approaches Toward a Cosmopolitan Education

Download Critical Approaches Toward a Cosmopolitan Education PDF

Author :
Publisher : Routledge
Release Date :
Language : EN, FR, GB
ISBN 10 : 9781000393101
Pages : 310 pages
File : PDF, EPUB, or MOBI
Rating : 4.0/5 (3 users download)


GO BOOK!


Summary Book Review Critical Approaches Toward a Cosmopolitan Education :

Download or read book Critical Approaches Toward a Cosmopolitan Education written by Sandra R. Schecter and published by Routledge. This book was released on 2021-08-29 with total page 310 pages. Available in PDF, EPUB and Kindle. Book excerpt: This book aims to reconceptualize teaching and learning in spaces with diverse populations of young people. Chapters focus on the schooling experiences and social and cultural adaptation issues of individuals who, through the meaning that they assign to their lived experiences, ascribe to multiple identity qualifiers. Contributors explore the impact of this cosmopolitan awareness on students, educators, and educational institutions, presenting issues such as curricular concerns around civic engagement, individual subjectivity versus social identity, and the convergence of context-specific policy and teaching environments on global dynamics in education reform. An emphasis on this understanding promises to better equip educators and policy-makers to plan instructional approaches and devise pedagogic resources that serve the needs and career aspirations of an expanding cohort of multifaceted learners.